Author Archives: Mark Layman

Atrial Fib … ”All Diseases Begin in the Gut” – Hippocrates: Connection or Not?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


After 80 years of body maintenance and repair, I thought that I could relax and enjoy life and do what I want, eat what I want and continue at the same pace as before. Not necessarily.

I have triumphed over heart problems including 2 heart attacks, 3 pacemakers, a robotic bypass and 35 years of atrial fib. Along the way were 2 hip replacements, cataracts and Hepatitis A. Now new wrinkles to deal with…excuse the pun…that too.

For the last few years along with acid reflux in the upper digestive system, I’ve developed lower digestive problems related to the colon and intestines. They were subtle at first. Acid reflux was the easiest to manage except from early on I mistook it for heart problems.

The lower abdominal problems were next. Diverticulosis produced pockets in the colon that can be managed by reducing stress and possibly diet. I’m working on both by eating uncomplicated foods in small quantities and adjusting my thought processes to ignore that which I can do nothing about.

The most recent problem occurred 6 months after my 80th birthday: pain in the left hip. Oh no, I thought. Initially I was told that replacements would last 12 to 15 years. Mine have lasted almost 20. The orthopedic doctor’s x-rays concluded that the hip replacements were fine. My problem is tendonitis which takes a ‘long time’ to heal. The doctor offered an anti-inflammatory drug that produced more stomach problems to my already sensitive “gut”.

Next: the fingers on my left hand became numb and tingled. It’s difficult to put on jewelry, button my clothes, open jars and plastic bottles. I asked electrophysiologist Dr. Hummel if this is related to heart problems. He doesn’t think so and suggested I see a neurologist.

The most recent problems are on the left side of my body where besides the tendonitis, colon, lower intestine, and numb fingers are the lower back aches almost constantly. I figured that this is from lack of exercise due to tendonitis.

All of the above was concluded by Certified Nurse Practitioner, Sasha Oumanets, at OSU Wexner Medical Center division of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition. My appointment with her was the most informative discussion between patient and medical professional that I could ever imagine and hope for.

In conclusion she offered this advice, “Why don’t you see a Chiropractor? All of these problems seem to be located on the left side. Maybe they are all related.”

Find out what happened with the Chiropractor. Meanwhile, check out IN A HEARTBEAT, The Ups and Downs of Life with Atrial Fib. Now getting attention by audiobook readers too.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


No Sex in St Tropez by Rosalie Ungar

Atrial Fib and the Nap

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


I once referred to sleeping in the daytime, a nap, as a precious waste of time. I have since changed my mind as with many of my own discoveries from forty or fifty years ago when life was a merry-go-round and I didn’t want to get off.

Mentioning this proclamation in my first memoir, NO SEX IN ST. TROPEZ, written about 1974 Europe, I experienced the short (30 minutes) afternoon rest or snooze while living and working in a French home. After lunch, the major meal of most days, we all retired to the bedrooms or the living room couch or porch lounge for quiet time…the parents, children, aunt, the cat and me.

I rarely slept. Instead I wrote letters or entries in my journal. After naptime, we had a strong cup of French coffee then everyone went on with the day going back to work or shopping or the beach. Shops closed during naptime.

During the last few years between 2:30 and 4:00 PM my memory (short term mostly) doesn’t work as well as it did that morning. I figured that it was the morning exercise that exhausted me, but memory and productivity was even worse on days I didn’t exercise. The work outs became a stimulant for an extra hour or two in the afternoon especially after a short nap.

Finally I saw what was happening when I noticed that along with others we were fighting the aging process. My bouts with atrial fib forced me to rest. Read more about it…IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups and Downs of Life with Atrial Fib–Here

My list for successful naps:

  • Sit in a comfy chair or recliner. Don’t lie down in bed. This tells your body you are taking a nap, not going in for the night. Don’t turn on the TV.
  • Set the clock for 30 to 40 minutes. I use my Smart Phone timer. When it goes off, it’s gentle. It won’t scare you out of the chair.
  • Sleep for 15 or 20 minutes only. It may take you 5 or 10 minutes to fall asleep, but you must clear your mind and not think anything negative or with pressure.
  • Sometimes I fall into a deep sleep, sometimes a light sleep calling it surface sleeping.
  • Upon waking up, try not to jump up with a jolt. I like to get up slowly. By sitting quietly for a few minutes, it gets the mind and body in sync.
  • It’s not until later that the value of that nap is realized. Without the nap, I’m ready for bed after dinner. With the nap I feel better with dinner and for several hours after dinner before retiring for the night.
  • If we have plans to go out for dinner, an event or guests coming over, I can handle it if I’d had a nap. If not, I’m grumpy and little dumb things bother me, using the energy I need somewhere else
  • Best of all, sleep is better that night waking up refreshed the next day.
  • Good sleep is a key to good health, especially good heart health.

Next week’s blog tackles ‘the gut’:

“All disease begins in the gut”– Hippocrates

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib Related to What?

IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib is not a medical book. It’s my story, containing my medical history and survival while maintaining and thriving with never ending medical problems none of which are cured. Most are managed but new ones occur from time to time.

The latest, intestinal, began gradually just a few years ago. I thought that I was getting more than my share of stomach viruses. When the stomach pains accompanied a bad bout of intestinal disorders leading me to the emergency room, I made an appointment with the gastroenterologist. Tests showed diverticulitis, pockets in the large intestine caused by a number of things…stress, diet and aging. Not heart problems.

I was reluctant to have a colonoscopy thinking that I could manage the problem with diet. I couldn’t and episodes with the same problems got worse. Oftentimes some doctors prefer not to do this test on patients over 75. I’m 80.

Finally I asked the gastroenterologist to schedule the colonoscopy. The test is not so bad but the prep, for a full day before the test, is not fun. It used to be that the kitchen was the most important room in the house, but on that day…it’s the bathroom.

The test took less than 40 minutes. Immediate results were ready for discussion with the doctor and a more detailed report arrived digitally later that day. A biopsy was taken that provided info that no cancer was found. The conclusions were that I have ischemic colitis, whatever that means. I made a follow up appointment with the gastroenterologist, then spent the next 2 hours reading all that I could absorb about ischemic colitis from the internet. Nowhere did I read that my new disease is related to diet or stress. It is, however, related to heart problems as is diabetes and aging.

Am I better? No, but I’m not worse. I’m still reluctant about eating having developed a taste for bland food. I’ve seen 3 dieticians. For the first time in my life, food is not the most important thing.

The bad about my new disease: searching for a comfortable way to manage it and having the confidence to do that. The good things about this new affliction: I don’t have cancer and I lost 40 pounds over the last 3 years. Recently I was referred to as ‘tiny’. I’ve waited all my life to hear those words.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


A-Fib … Not a Death Sentence

By guest blogger Lisa Eliason

Lisa Eliason has been a guest blogger here twice. Her blogs have attracted readers in all phases of A-Fib. Lisa’s heart problems, anxieties and solutions have mirrored mine. Maybe they will help you overcome yours. Here is her latest.


I was visiting my sister-in-law the first time I had an A-Fib episode. I said my good nights and retired to the bedroom. I was in bed for a few minutes when my heart started to race. I was alone and I knew exactly what was happening. I was experiencing atrial fibrillation.

My mother’s sister, whom I follow very closely genetically, had A-Fib and I had heard her talk of it. I debated whether to call my husband or wake my sister-in-law. I was scared. Finally I fell asleep repeating my childhood prayer, ‘If I should die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to take.’

I awoke in the morning with no irregular heart beat that I could feel. I was only 57 years old.

Over the next several months I would experience more episodes. My family doctor thought stress was the culprit and wanted to prescribe anti-anxiety medication. During a minor surgery my heart started to race and the surgery was aborted. I awoke to the surgeon looking ashen and nurses frantically awaiting a cardiologist.

Over the next several months I saw numerous specialists and wore a Holter Heart Monitor but it didn’t catch the A-Fib episodes. Many times the episodes came at night when my husband was traveling for work. It was during those times that I was the most terrified and sure that this was a death sentence.

I repeated this to my aunt who assured me I was not going to die and recommended an electrophysiologist at Ross Heart Hospital, Dr. John Hummel. Dr. Hummel is the rock star of electrophysiologists. On my first visit he outlined two plans of action: medication to slow the heart rate or heart ablation surgery. I first chose the medication and at times my heart rate slowed to 35 beats per minute. On a subsequent visit I had a loop recorder surgically implanted to catch the A-Fib episodes, then decided on heart ablation surgery. The surgery was a success and I have been A-Fib free for three years.

The key to my success was knowledge. Knowledge is power. I studied A-Fib on my own and read blogs just like this. Perhaps the most important part of the journey was talking to someone else experiencing A-Fib and being assured that A-Fib was not the death sentence I thought it to be.


Thanks Lisa. Your information is so important.

You can also read IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib on audio books at Audible.com, Amazon.com or in paperback available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or ebook from Kindle, Nook, iTunes or Kobo. Just click here or on one of the icons below.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib and the Heart Bypass

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


The progression of safe and common heart procedures and new equipment and technology is amazing. Almost 20 years ago I had a heart attack while giving a speech about heart healthy foods. Did I have any warning? Yes. Six weeks before that I had similar chest pain while boarding a plane to visit my children and grandchildren. The pain went away after a few minutes but it left me tired and with a sore chest. I did nothing about it even though I had suffered with and was in treatment for atrial fib. You can read the whole story IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups and Downs of Life with Arial Fib, a memoir. Click here.

Besides being stupid about the initial chest pain episode, I was lucky even though I was halfway across the country at the time. My thinking was that it was a new wrinkle in my long history of atrial fib. Then I was told that atrial fib had nothing to do with the heart attack.

Now research has discovered that everything including atrial fib has to do with heart attacks: thyroid disease, diabetes, smoking, diet, exercise, gender and genetics. Care and condition of teeth, blocked arteries of the eyes and, of course the biggie…stress. All of this including medications have major impact on heart disease.

The heart is a complicated organ. Twenty years ago it was discovered that my heart attack was caused by a blockage in the major artery on the outside of the heart sometimes referred to as ‘the widow maker.’ Actually it’s the left anterior descending artery. I was scheduled for open heart surgery, but because it was a single artery bypass and in location of easy access, I was a candidate for a then new surgery developed by Dr. Randall Wolf. He was on loan to OSU, a teaching hospital, to instruct his procedure to other endoscopic coronary surgeons for a less invasive bypass surgery.

Instead of ‘open heart’, a small incision was made under the left breast and a robot was inserted tying off the mammary artery to bypass the blockage. It didn’t take long and I was home 2 days later.

Now 20 years later the robotic heart surgery has held and I have improved my lifestyle by weight loss, healthy diet, careful attention to my meds, a dedicated exercise program and marrying Ed.

It appears that the robotic heart bypass has in part been replaced by the stent, but 20 years ago there was something similar called the ‘balloon’ to clear the arteries. My cardiologist at the time told me that the artery blockage I had was filled with ‘junk’—a combination of calcium, plaque, cholesterol and ‘stuff’ that may have been accumulating since I was a teenager.

A few years ago an echo cardiogram revealed that I have no evidence of any heart damage from my heart attacks. I am told that eliminating that muscle damage is rare. I see its success from my lifestyle changes, especially exercise.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib and the Aging Bladder

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Home from the Urgent Care, just a few minutes ago. Not crowded, Ed and I got in right away. Our pockets full of anti-bacterial wipes fearing that the major flu epidemic is spreading germs our way, we were in and out in less than an hour not touching anything.

About a week ago during the night I was on my 2nd trip to the bathroom. I’d heard Ed come back just minutes before. Fumbling around in the dark aware that Ed had turned off the dimmed light usually kept on at night, I headed in the right direction but at the wrong speed. Some of my meds can cause dizziness and I’m aware of that, not always at 4 AM. The commode came up quickly and before I could stop, my head hit the cabinet above with a bang. I yelled “ouch!”.

Unable to get back to sleep, I kept one eye on the Merlin@home pacemaker transmitter about 4 feet from my bed. Using the house Wi-Fi, it transmits my heart rate to a data center. A green light is constantly on as long as I am not in atrial fib. The bump on my forehead hurt and, as always, a new problem scares me. The green light stayed on.

I ignored the bump. It ached. Two days ago the skin at the outside corners of both eyes turned purple and red. It started to circle my eyes. Is it a blood clot? I was worried. The bump was smaller and turning yellow.

What if it’s a blood clot and I’m not taking a blood thinner because I choose not to. Am I wrong? Dr. Hummel would prefer I be safe and take it. I had 35 years of atrial fib and took warfarin for 12 of them.

The urgent care doctor explained that the bump appeared to be healing and the blood that it contained was draining causing the purplish bruises which would go away in a few days to a week. And no, it wasn’t a blood clot on its way to the brain as I imagined.

I told the doctor that I don’t take a blood thinner when he asked, but that I do take a full strength aspirin. “That’s why you have the bruising.” He said, “It’s good, that in this case you don’t take a blood thinner.” I was vindicated from my guilt that I was not taking a blood thinner.

The aging process might be easier without such an active bladder. But then, puberty and menopause weren’t so easy either.

Read more details IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib, a memoir.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib and Aging

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


February is Heart Month, Black History Month and the one year anniversary for my 3rd pacemaker. I’m halfway into my 80th year of living and so far, it’s not so bad. I can say today that all of my medical problems are being managed to my satisfaction. That’s not to say that new situations, not problems necessarily, don’t occur.

Most of them have to do with aging, for which I think I’m prepared. Fighting the aging process uses energy that I’d prefer to use elsewhere like keeping up a moderate exercise routine, and stimulating my brain with memory games and reading. Getting more sleep and maintaining a healthy diet take some planning as does managing the meds.

It all comes down to maintenance and coming to terms with everyday changes. My short term memory isn’t as good as it used to be. What I mean by ‘short term’ is that I sometimes forget whether I took that pill or not…just 10 minutes ago. Now for meds I have 3 containers with 7 tiny boxes marked S,M,T,W,T,F,S  days of the week. Each one has a day’s meds, a total of 21 days. Not only does it keep track of the daily meds but when it is time to reorder I won’t be out at the last minute or on a day I can’t get the refill. It also helps to keep track of insurance that might have stipulations on claims.

Another aging change is more structural. My fingers don’t work as well as they used to. Arthritis has reared its ugly head in useful parts of my body as it has with many of us. Buttoning and unbuttoning garments becomes a chore. Zippers and pull on garments are making me pay less attention to fashion and more to ease and comfort. Alas, I’ve chosen not to wear some of the lovely jewelry that I can no longer fasten and unfasten.

February is usually the month I have my annual appointment with electrophysiologist Dr. John Hummel. This year it’s March 1st. I have been A-Fib free since 2008 but that doesn’t stop Dr. Hummel from trying to talk me into taking a blood thinner again. Read more about it in my book, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib or listen to it on audio book.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Also available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


ARE YOU LISTENING?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


In the above photo of Rosalie Linver Ungar taken in 1961 I am listening to puppet friends Gabby (left) and Goobers (right) on my weekly Saturday morning live TV show at KELP-TV, El Paso, Texas. The Goobers Show featured the 2 puppets and Gina (that’s me) singing, dancing and spouting lively patter entertaining children while teaching life lessons…like listening.

“You have 2 ears and 1 mouth…so, you should listen twice as much as you talk.” My mother used to tell me that when she thought I wasn’t listening, which was most of the time.

That leads me into today’s blog, the audiobook. Now you can listen to my book IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib on audiobook from Amazon, Audible.com and iTunes. You won’t need a CD player or a tangible CD. The audiobook is digital. All you need is a Smart Phone, laptop, iPhone, Android, iPad or tablet. No need for earphones unless you want privacy. It’s so easy.

Audible.com is the most popular. Click here for my book and directions to buy it digitally. It will appear on your device for listening, or you can plug in your earphones on your device and hear it privately. If you become an Audible.com customer, the first audiobook is free. Subscribers can acquire credits for books.

If you prefer to buy it from Amazon, click here and it will take you to the IN A HEARTBEAT Amazon page that offers and shows the paperback, Kindle and now a third format available…the audiobook. Click on that link and follow directions for immediate installation on your device.

IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib is narrated by actress Hannah Edelson. She’s fabulous and will keep you engaged for the 4 hours and 45 minutes or parts thereof. Send me an email using the email address on my Contact/Resources page.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Now available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


100 Years: Does It Make a Difference?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Joseph Wellington Plaine died exactly 100 years ago on February 11, 1918. He was my uncle, my father Victor’s older brother, born 1899 in Newark, Ohio.

Joseph Plaine died in World War I. Known as the Great War, the First World War was fought mostly in Europe from 1914 – 1918. My uncle enlisted the day he turned 18, August 1, 1917, two months after the United States entered the war. He wasted no time in showing patriotism for his country.

Though I heard vague references to this uncle while growing up and that he died at an early age in WWI, I knew very little about him. Now my interest in studying genetics related to my family signaled a new interest in Uncle Joseph. Did he have the same genes as the rest of the family who all suffered from heart problems, atrial fib and eventually death?

Trained as a signalman in the United States Navy, Joseph Plaine attended the Naval Training Station in Newport, Connecticut. In November of 1917 he was assigned to three different merchant ships that were crossing the Atlantic to Europe and back.

In the last letter to his parents January 20, 1918, he wrote saying that he would be leaving again for Europe the next day. The official report was received by his parents (my grandparents) 6 months later from the Navy stating in part, “the records show that Joseph Plaine was a seaman signalman on board the SS Merton Hall which was sunk February 11, 1918, and the case (whatever that means) has been taken up with the commander of the Naval forces operating in European Waters.”

Officially it was stated that about 2:30 PM the SS Merton Hall (a British merchant ship on its way to France) was torpedoed by the German submarine U-boat-53. The ship went down in a minute and a half in the English Channel 30 miles off the island of Ushant. It is confirmed that Joseph Plaine was the only US military person on board.

Purely my speculation: My research shows that the SS Merton Hall was a cargo ship and could have been carrying armament (even though it was officially stated as carrying a cargo of steel). As a naval signalman, Joseph’s job could have been to signal friendly ships of the presence of enemy ships. The explosion happened too quickly for that.

Another fact to tie into this story is that after training at the Naval Training Station in Newport, Connecticut, Joseph was assigned to the U.S.S. Arizona in Norfolk, Virginia. Twenty-three years later the Arizona was bombed at Pearl Harbor triggering our entry into World War II.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Now available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: Must I Go to the Gym?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


It’s 4 degrees outside, still dark at 7:00 AM. Mid-January. Gotta turn the heat up and get to the gym. Not easy. Last week was worse but I skipped the exercise because I still had some tendinitis in my left hip. It’s better, but not gone yet. My trainer said to come back and we’d do light upper body exercise and treadmill without the incline for now.

Do you know how hard it is to get back in the exercise habit after being off for 2 or 3 weeks… in winter? Think positive thoughts about what to wear to the gym and my new black and white Nike workout shoes. Feel the gentle aches after the workout and meeting my friend Pearl for breakfast at Panera on Mondays during summer. Those are the times I remind myself that it’s great to be alive and well.

Last week I received an email from a blog reader who read one of my earlier blogs about exercise and A-Fib. Allyse describes herself as a die hard fitness fanatic. She works for a company that reviews exercise equipment, among other things, and she told me about exercise spinning bikes that she recommends, 2 of them. One, less than $400 and another around $700.

My favorite of all cardio exercise is the stationary bike. For me it was a gradual success. I started in a sitting position and pedaling for a steady 15 minutes increasing the tension as I could. Then I did a standing pedaling position. Initially I could only last 15 seconds standing, increasing to a minute the first year and so on. I can do 6 minutes with medium tension and am getting up nerve to do a spinning class. Not bad for an 80 year old, but moderation is on the horizon.

Meanwhile, Allyse works for Reviews.com. Check it out! Then check out my book, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Now available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes
In a Heartbeat on iTunes