ATRIAL FIB: Must I Go to the Gym?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


It’s 4 degrees outside, still dark at 7:00 AM. Mid-January. Gotta turn the heat up and get to the gym. Not easy. Last week was worse but I skipped the exercise because I still had some tendinitis in my left hip. It’s better, but not gone yet. My trainer said to come back and we’d do light upper body exercise and treadmill without the incline for now.

Do you know how hard it is to get back in the exercise habit after being off for 2 or 3 weeks… in winter? Think positive thoughts about what to wear to the gym and my new black and white Nike workout shoes. Feel the gentle aches after the workout and meeting my friend Pearl for breakfast at Panera on Mondays during summer. Those are the times I remind myself that it’s great to be alive and well.

Last week I received an email from a blog reader who read one of my earlier blogs about exercise and A-Fib. Allyse describes herself as a die hard fitness fanatic. She works for a company that reviews exercise equipment, among other things, and she told me about exercise spinning bikes that she recommends, 2 of them. One, less than $400 and another around $700.

My favorite of all cardio exercise is the stationary bike. For me it was a gradual success. I started in a sitting position and pedaling for a steady 15 minutes increasing the tension as I could. Then I did a standing pedaling position. Initially I could only last 15 seconds standing, increasing to a minute the first year and so on. I can do 6 minutes with medium tension and am getting up nerve to do a spinning class. Not bad for an 80 year old, but moderation is on the horizon.

Meanwhile, Allyse works for Reviews.com. Check it out! Then check out my book, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Now available as audio book from Amazon.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: Fitness and Aging

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


We’re halfway through the first month of 2018 and I’m wondering how many resolutions were made about exercise and how many have stuck. How about healthy diet?

Stories about fitness and eating and the New Year are all over the newspapers. I’ve always done some kind of movement but only in the last 15 years have I been devoted to exercising with a trainer. That’s when I retired from my job at age 65. At first I worked out 5 days a week with the trainer in group sessions and played 18 holes of golf at least one weekend day.

Then, after a few years, I went to 4 days a week. I realized that I didn’t think about food all of the time. I weighed 165 pounds…not terrible for my height showing signs of aging by losing vertical inches. A few years later I went to 9 holes of golf once a week and 3 days a week at the gym. The weight was coming off and I developed acid reflux along with heart issues as described IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

Fitness became an obsession along with maintaining healthy insides. It wasn’t easy. Just as one health problem became manageable, a new one came along. I stopped playing golf. Now 3 times a week at the gym. As I entered age 80 my lower back didn’t take too well to sit ups, pushups, squats and other lower body movements suggesting a need to moderate.

My left groin hurt. That was worrisome because it could be the hip. Almost 20 years ago I had both hips replaced. I was told that hip replacements lasted 12 to 15 years. Mine are going on 20 years. I felt that if I exercised and built up the muscles around the hip replacements, it would cushion and preserve the artificial hips. It did.

So, now what’s wrong? I went to see my orthopedic doctor who x-rayed the hips and checked my pain, walking and the x-rays. “The hips look perfect,” he said showing me the x-rays on the wall monitor.

Then he told me that I had tendinitis. I was happy to hear that. Crazy happy that I didn’t injure the artificial hip. The doctor told me to let it heal 4 to 8 weeks, use heat then ice and he gave me a prescription for an anti-inflammatory to take once a day. Hooray. It’s been a couple of weeks. It still hurts, but not as much.

Today I read in the newspaper that as we age, even light activity and exercise can help you live longer… a significant percentage of decline in mortality during a specific period of time.

Next week more about fitness, aging and exercise equipment.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: Are You In Denial?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


I read that 130,000 people Google the term “atrial fib or atrial fibrillation” each month. Who are they? Some may have felt irregular heartbeats themselves or heart palpitations or have family members that have been diagnosed with A-Fib. If it doesn’t happen again for a long time do they forget about it? Maybe. Could it have happened again and they didn’t feel it? How many times? They’ll never know.

I don’t have answers to those questions. I am not a doctor. I can only tell you what happened to me when I first felt an “irregular heartbeat” at age 43 in the early 1980s. I took my pulse and couldn’t get a steady beat, so I stopped taking my pulse. A few hours later it was regular. A few months later I had my annual checkup and the doctor told me that I was in atrial fib.  “What’s that?” I asked. He said that it could cause a stroke. I had other unrelated health problems to worry about.

It happened again in my endocrinologist’s office. He made an appointment for me with a cardiologist. I was under her care for 20 years. It kept happening, more and more. Now I felt it.

Nothing could be done except to keep the blood thin to avoid a stroke and take anti-arrhythmia drugs that only partially worked. I was told that one doesn’t die from atrial fibrillation but that strokes can be fatal. Blood thinners were to be taken to keep the blood from clotting which can cause a stroke.

So, in the year 2000 when I had a heart attack, I was told that it was unrelated to my atrial fib. What’s more, further tests showed that I had previously had a smaller heart attack. I remembered it about 6 weeks earlier, intense pain in the middle of my chest, but it went away. I felt tired for days after. I didn’t call my doctor.

I had been in denial. I could have died. I didn’t know that living through a heart attack causes unrepairable damage to the heart muscle, diminishing its effectiveness. I had atrial fib and a damaged heart. New discoveries were made to help patients deal with A-Fib and even ablate it altogether. New devices were invented to control and eliminate A-Fib. More work is being done

I became an advocator and devoted myself to accepting and repairing my heart. I HAVE NOW REVERSED ALL HEART DAMAGE DONE BY THE HEART ATTACKS.  Here’s how I did it:

  • Paying attention to my medications, what they do, their side effects, compatibility with other drugs, asking questions and getting to know my pharmacists.
  • Starting an exercise program that has become part of my life at least 3 times a week.
  • Having a heart ablation procedure that eliminated electrical pathways causing A-Fib.
  • Continuing a heart healthy diet that began even before atrial fib.
  • Partnering and communicating with my doctors.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB BOOKS:Why Read IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Judge’s Commentary from Writer’s Digest Magazine 25th Annual Book Awards (2017):

“Author Rosalie Ungar has not only atrial fibrillation, which she refers to throughout her memoir as A-Fib, but a pacemaker. However, as a healthy woman in her late 70s who can do more exercise than ever before in her life, her narrative seems, in fact, to be one of the best resources I have ever seen to answer the myriad questions every person suffering heart issues must have in terms of modern therapies, pacemakers and medical procedures. The reader will learn that people with pacemakers must not have an MRI or be checked with an electric coil wand at airport security. While the author overcame her difficulties, it is very clear during her narrative that she got much worse before she got better.

“The A-Fib could wrench her out of sleep and drain her of all her energy. Her medications were becoming less and less effective. Frankly, I was astounded that the author got her life back after the heart ablation.

“The pages turn easily in Ungar’s account and the reader will feel admiration. It was fascinating to learn that the rate at which the pacemaker makes the heart beat can be regulated, obviously guided by general health circumstances.

“Rosalie Linver Ungar is a very intelligent writer who lays out her own story without embarrassment and benefits readers a great deal in the knowledge she shares. This book is for a niche audience interested in heart health and atrial fibrillation.”

Thank you Writer’s Digest Magazine.

In last week’s blog, I gave readers a link to an interview I gave to Managing Editor Jodie Elrod for this month’s issue of EP Lab Digest, an international publication for electro physiologists, cardiologists, doctors and hospitals. When you read this article, you will see that my memoir IN A HEARTBEAT is not a medical book. It’s my story told in novel form. 

Next week I’ll address the following issues:

  • Why are so many with A-Fib in denial about getting treatment and seriousness of this problem?
  • Why do more men than women get treatment?
  • Why are some patients afraid to change doctors when not satisfied with current issues of treatment and communication?

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: Managing Heart Health & Taking Control

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Last week two good things happened drawing attention to my own heart health:

  • The worldwide monthly magazine for electrophysiology professionals EP LAB DIGEST published a two-page interview with me about my book IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib. Not long ago, the managing editor of EP Lab Digest contacted me through this website and the blogs you’ve been reading and asked if I would be interviewed for her magazine. We did a phone interview and a few weeks later the interview was published in the current December issue. A link to the magazine and the interview titled Living Atrial Fibrillation – My Story is here.

    Let me know what you think. Do you have questions? Did it help you?

  • The same week I had to have my bi-annual meds check, mainly because of the sotalol heart arrhythmia drug that I take and have been taking for 10 years. At these blood draws every 6 months, testing is done for all the meds I take as well as an EKG. When Dr. Hummel’s office called with the results I was told that I should cut back on 2 medications: Instead of taking 2 80mg. sotalol tablets per day, 12 hours apart, I could now take only one, either morning or before bedtime.

    The other med, potassium capsules – 6 of them are gigantic (to me) for swallowing. Now I only have to take 4 of them, 2 in the morning and 2 at night. That cuts my daily pill count to 3 less meds making me so happy. I was taking 20 pills a day and now am down to 17, many of them are either vitamins and/or supplements.

    Why take heart meds at bedtime? I’ve read that blood pressure meds should be taken at night before bedtime. I don’t take blood pressure meds, but taking the other heart meds at night are for my convenience, a habit at about the same time every night, and like brushing teeth, I won’t forget. And, I sometimes feel that taking the meds at night insures that I’ll wake up in the morning. That’s just me.
  • So what happened to cause lowering the dosage of 2 heart meds? Here’s what I think:
    1. Losing 40 pounds over 5 or 6 years.
    2. Regular exercise with a trainer over the last 13 years
    3. Reducing food portions and eating a heart healthy diet which I have learned to love.
    4. Cutting out most desserts unless just a taste.
    5. Cutting alcohol to 1 glass of red wine a week.
    6. Attitude: I love life and am prepared to face everything else head-on.

All meds have side effects, some are bad and others not so bad. By reducing the sotalol in half and potassium by a third, I expect to feel less tired and have fewer balance difficulties. Is it for real? Maybe it’s just attitude. We’ll see in 6 months at the next meds check.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB … And Sleep Apnea

 

Here is another uplifting blog from guest blogger Lisa Eliason about managing atrial fib. Her ‘take charge’ attitude in managing her health is remarkable & has attracted many readers to these blogs and to my memoir, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups and Downs of Life with Atrial Fib. Read what Lisa has to say about sleep apnea.


I often think about the old adage of “which came first the chicken or the egg” when I think of my health issues that began to appear in 2012.

I first noticed shortness of breath, constant stuffiness and then heart arrhythmia. At night, I would often wake gasping for breath. My family doctor’s only answer was that I must be suffering from anxiety. It was during an attempt at sinus surgery that my heart arrhythmia was recognized. I went to Ross Heart Hospital for treatment that included heart ablation surgery and the insertion of a “loop” heart monitor. I returned to my family doctor. He was not apologetic about missing the diagnosis of heart arrhythmia but did make an effort to determine the cause of my constant stuffiness and nighttime gasps for breath. He ordered a series of allergy tests and a sleep apnea study.

The allergy tests revealed nothing and the doctor didn’t test for food allergies. However, from the sleep study, he did determined I had sleep apnea.

I went to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor in Columbus for the constant stuffiness and the ENT recommended nasal steroids. Nasal steroids didn’t work. I took matters into my own hands and after research cut out seven highly inflammatory foods from my diet. The stuffiness cleared up.

My insurance paid for a C-PAP machine for the sleep apnea. Six years later the C-PAP machine still sits tucked into the back of my closet. I was fifty-six years old at the time.  Using the C-PAP machine seemed to me to be a death knell. In my mind, only old people used C-PAP machines.

I was still seeing the ENT. I discussed the sleep apnea with him and my reluctance to use the C-PAP machine. He told me to lose ten pounds and wrote a prescription for a mouth device that would fit over my top and bottom teeth, hook together and pull my lower jaw forward to open my airway. Although insurance would pay for a $1,000 C-Pap machine, it would not pay for the mouth device. I took the prescription to my dentist who created the mouth guard and gave me a discount since insurance would not pay.

I took the ENT’s advice to heart and actually lost forty pounds. During the whole weight loss journey, I used the mouth guard every night. After the forty pound weight loss, clearer sinuses and the mouth guard, I no longer wake at night gasping for breath. I haven’t had another sleep apnea study. I may or may not still have sleep apnea, but I now wake up rested in the morning when I did not before.

So which came first? The sleep apnea or the heart arrhythmia?  Did my gasping for breath cause my heart to get out of rhythm?  I will never have that answer.  I do know that cutting out inflammatory foods and the weight loss made all of the difference in my health.


Thanks Lisa. My next week’s blog will continue about successes in managing heart health and how we can take control.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib: Your Pulse

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Last week’s blog about finding your pulse to know whether or not you’re in atrial fib left out one important factor. Thank you readers for alerting me that many patients don’t know what the average resting pulse rate should be. Besides being in a steady rhythm, the number of beats per minute at rest can vary for adults from 60 to 100 beats per minute.

So, if you take your own pulse at the inside of your wrist or on your neck to the side of your windpipe, check the second hand on your watch or clock and count the beats for 15 seconds and multiply by 4. If you count 15 beats that’s a rate of 60 beats per minute…a good number.

I take my pulse looking at the clock for a full minute because for years mine was irregular. It’s more accurate for a full 60 seconds. If your count is 20 beats in 15 seconds, that’s 80. Read more about that in my memoir, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

A lower resting heart rate of 40 to 50 beats per minute usually indicates a more efficient heart function. Often this implies cardiovascular fitness. During exercise the rate can climb to as high as 120 or more, but when exercise ceases, the resting rate should return. However, if the heart rate is constantly above 100 at rest or always below 50, you should consult your doctor.

I wear a pacemaker that controls my lowest heart rate. You and your doctor can decide on the  heart rate setting. My pacemaker is set at a heart rate of 60 beats per minute. When I exercise it goes as high as 80 or 90 and sometimes 100, but it never goes lower than 60. I cover that information in an earlier blog about pacemakers. Many factors influence heart rate and rhythm:

  • Activity level
  • Fitness level
  • Air temperature
  • Body position (standing up or lying down)
  • Emotions
  • Body size
  • Medications

It is documented that exercise is one of the best meds. Cardio workouts include elliptical, treadmill, spinning bike, rowing machine and sled. A picture of me pushing the sled is shown below. I used to do 100 pushups but since turning 80, my best is 50 with a 10 second rest at 25.

 

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: How Do You Know?

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Take your pulse. Do you know how?  Could we learn from watching Law & Order on TV as detectives quickly check a body for a pulse? That’s tricky.

The question I get from readers or fellow A-Fib patients is, “How do you know if you’re in it?”

You don’t always, according to my doctors and from my own personal experiences. The first time I recognized what was known as ‘irregular heartbeat’ was when a fitness instructor told my class to cool down with a moderate walk while taking the pulse. I couldn’t find mine. When I did, it felt like a bird fluttering its wings. I was 43 years old. It was 1980. I was too young and full of energy to worry about it and didn’t think about it for a few years when it became noticeable.

I was lucky. It could have resulted in a stroke. Instead I got treatment from a cardiologist and later an electrophysiologist. That journey is documented in my memoir, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

My mother taught me how to take my pulse when I was a child. She was a nurses’ aide at a blood mobile during World War Two. More recently I’ve discovered that many people don’t know how to take their pulse, including a worker at an assisted living facility where I was giving a talk about my book.

The pulse can be checked at several places in your body. For me, it’s easiest to check at my wrist under the thumb by placing 2 fingers of the opposite hand between the bone and the tendon on the thumb side of the inside wrist. Never use your thumb because it has its own pulse that may interfere.

Other places for checking pulse and rhythms are high up on the neck between the neck and the ear (this is called the carotid pulse) and more difficult body parts such as top of the foot, the groin or behind the knee.

When you find your pulse, check the rhythm by counting the beats in a minute, so you need a watch or clock with a second hand. You can count the beats in 15 seconds and multiply by 4 or take it for a full 60 seconds.

If you want further proof that you have bouts of A-Fib, or for some who are in A-Fib all of the time and don’t feel it, discuss installing a ‘loop’ with your doctor.  My guest blogger, Lisa Eliason, wrote a blog about the loop on this website a few weeks ago.

The most reliable way to check is still the EKG, which is usually available in a clinic or physician’s office.

I had atrial fib for more than 35 years. Now I don’t, but that doesn’t mean it won’t appear again. It started out slowly for me. It got worse as time went on. I check my pulse twice every day. Get treatment. It’s so much easier than dealing with a stroke.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


Atrial Fib: SO MUCH IS HAPPENING

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib. Visit the Contact page if you have comments or questions for Rosalie, or if you would like to be a guest blogger.


I like to think that my recent memoir, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib, creates an awareness to new discoveries in the relationships to all forms of heart disease and other diseases of the body.

Just the other day I read an article by Dr. John Barnard, President of the Research Institute of Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. He writes that biological research shows that the immune system could influence a basic life function such as the heartbeat. Though, I realize that I am not a doctor, I have been reading and hearing about new connections between heart disease and other previously believed unrelated health issues.

I hope that my readers are educating themselves about their own health problems. For that reason I want to quote some of the comments I receive from reviews and readers:

  • “I was hooked by the time I finished reading the first paragraph, as Ungar described her terrifying symptoms of a heart attack while addressing 25 men and women at a conference many miles from home.” Was the heart attack related to my atrial fib?
  • “Finally a book written from a patient’s point of view.” From another patient.
  • “….reads like an adventure story with mysteries, hurtles and purpose and is impossible to put down.” New research is creating new mysteries.
  • “Atrial fibrillation is essentially an epidemic. This book truly comes ‘from the heart’ and is about the heart. Rosalie Ungar captures the complex issues that patients face, and shows that A-Fib can be disruptive to one’s life. She also shows that with a combination of the right physicians and a patient willing to partner with physicians, A-Fib can be controlled, and life can go on wonderfully well. I highly recommend this to any patient or family member of a patient dealing with A-Fib.” From a doctor!
  • “The author’s personal experiences helped me know that I’m not alone. A must read. Thank you Rosalie Ungar for such a helpful book.” Support groups, such as Healing Hearts of Central Ohio, that educate patients while networking doctors, families, and patients.

I strive to thrive and survive. It takes energy and attitude, neither of which happen without effort. Atrial Fibrillation was with me for 35 years. I’ve been free of it for almost 11 years.

Read more reviews…all 5 star…on Amazon.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes


ATRIAL FIB: DOWNPLAYING YOUR SYMPTOMS

Rosalie Ungar is the author of IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.


Statistics show that 70% of men with atrial fib get treatment. Only 30% of women with atrial fib get treatment. Why is that?

My experience in talking to more than just a few women of various ages either with or without A-Fib or related problems say that they prefer not to know too much. Some do what the doctor says but don’t want to know the details and most don’t ask questions.

My theory is that the younger women are too busy. Some with families don’t feel they can take the time off to get treatment, some may feel invincible because their A-Fib comes and goes. I use to feel that way, mainly because I felt I couldn’t take the time off from work to get treatment. After all, I grew up in an era when options for women were limited. If a woman had a good job and could, if necessary, be replaced by a man, she was fearful that taking time off for a little known health problem could jeopardize her livelihood.

I am perplexed, however, as to why some women in their 70s and older don’t take A-Fib seriously. Many downplay their symptoms.

Men, on the other hand, are often diagnosed at a younger age. It is reported that gender symptoms vary and now treatment may vary between men and women. Could it be that women are the reason? We push men to take better care of themselves, sometimes at the expense of our own care. Wives often make an appointment with the doctor and just tell their husbands, “You have an appointment with the cardiologist and you have to go. I‘m going with you.” Subject closed.

Mother used to say, “Along with age comes aches and pains. Live with them and do what you have to do to feel better.” She was so set on not complaining, she’d say, “No one wants to hear you complain. Handle it.”

That was over 50 years ago. Ok Mom. I’m 80. I feel good. Atrial fibrillation is mostly an easy fix. I did it. Find out how in my memoir, IN A HEARTBEAT: The Ups & Downs of Life with Atrial Fib.

In a Heartbeat is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats.
The book is also available at Barnes & Noble as a paperback and Nook book.
Digital versions are available on Kobo and iTunes.
Soon available as audio book.

Get the book here!
In a Heartbeat on AmazonIn a Heartbeat on Barnes and NobleIn a Heartbeat on KoboIn a Heartbeat on iTunes